Healing Veterans Mobile Series

Help empower wounded warriors in their recovery process. “Healing Veterans” video series (head trauma, burn injuries, loss of limbs, and torso wounds) includes 54 videos, 18 in each injury category, that appeal to veterans’ military training and mindset while providing practical objectives and recovery milestones. Videos will include health information, testimonials from recovering veterans and family members, encouragement from military leaders, and milestones in recovery. 

Traumatic Brain Injury and PTSD  

Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan primary causes of TBI are from blasts, blast plus motor vehicle accidents (MVA’s), MVA’s alone, and gunshot wounds (Summerall, 2017). Blast exposure produces different TBI symptoms then falls or MVA’s. Veterans seem to experience the post-concussive symptoms for longer than the civilian population; some studies show most will still have residual symptoms 18-24 months after the injury (Summerall, 2017). In addition, many Veterans have multiple medical problems. The comorbidity of PTSD, history of mild TBI, chronic pain and substance abuse is common and may complicate recovery from any single diagnosis. Given these special considerations, it is especially important to reassure Veterans that their symptoms are time-limited and, with appropriate treatment and healthy behaviors, likely to improve. 

To manage this new injury profile, the VA has initiated the Polytrauma System of Care, which treats patients with traumatic brain injury who also have experienced musculoskeletal, neurologic and psychological trauma. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that education for the patient and family early in the course of recovery can improve outcomes in patients with TBI and help to prevent the development of other psychological problems. Unfortunately, many patients and their families do not receive education early in the course of illness and may require intervention after symptoms have become well established. Currently, the VA encourages a recovery message when prognosis is discussed, and inclusion of the family in treatment planning. 

PRODUCE: 18, 4-6 minute patient and family educational videos that are integrated into a mobile app experience that provides recovery journey support. 

FEATURING: The San Antonio Ploytrauma Rehabilitation Center 

INTERVIEWS WITH: Notable TBI experts as well as service men and women who have overcome their injuries. 

Amputee Recovery  

The needs of the service members and veterans vary by level of limb loss, severity of other injuries and comorbidities, stage of rehabilitation, need for financial support, benefits, and many other factors including pain, phantom limb sensations, and psychiatric problems. 

In addition, technological advances in upper-limb prosthetics have “lagged behind” those made in lower-limb prosthetics due to the complexity of replacing an upper limb and re-establishing its many functions. Those with upper-limb amputations abandon their prostheses more often than those with lower-limb amputations because they are unhappy with their devices, (Resnik, 2017). 

Psychiatric problems (such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) are predictable following amputation. Treatment after amputation involves planning a rehabilitation regimen (even prior to the surgery), managing the immediate postoperative period, planning for an appropriate level of care after discharge, and educating the patient and family to prevent complications. In particular, education of patients and their families is aimed at the care and prevention of complications; and includes attention to limb care and inspection, limb wrapping, prosthetic care, stump care, foot care, and emergency care and monitoring for early signs of infection (Bhuvaneswar, Epstein, and Stern, 2007). 

PRODUCE: 18, 4-6 minute patient and family educational videos that are integrated into a mobile app experience that provides recovery journey support. 

FEATURING: The San Antonio Center for the Intrepid and Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Center for Limb Loss and MoBility 

INTERVIEWS WITH: Notable amputee experts as well as service men and women who have overcome their injuries. 

Burn Recovery 

Burn rehabilitation is an undeniably difficult and time consuming effort that, to attain the objective of optimal long-term function, must begin at the outset of burn care. Treatment goals and strategies vary, depending on the patient’s injury, stage of treatment, age, and comorbidities. Goals range from minimizing loss of range of motion (ROM) in the critically ill patient to establishing a work-hardening program in recovered patients (Sheridan, 2016). 

Survival was once the only gauge of success in managing serious burn cases. Today, however, the overriding objective of burn care has become reintegration of the patient into the home and community. This goal has extended the traditional role of the burn care team beyond acute wound closure. Burn rehabilitation is undeniably difficult and time consuming, but the time spent on outlining short-term and long-term treatment goals and modalities is worthwhile. 

The burn therapist’s initial assessment and care of patients with serious burns is the beginning of a long-term relationship. Effective communication is one of the key factors determining the successful functioning of the team, and with patients and their families. Realistic therapeutic goals, as well as an appropriate plan of care, should be devised by the treatment team, including the patient and family. it is critical that there is a development of continuous feedback from therapeutic responses during the emotional, psychological, and physiological recovery and rehabilitation of the burned patient (Al-Mousawi, Mecott-Rivera, Jeschke, Herndon, 2009). 

PRODUCE: 18, 4-6 minute patient and family educational videos that are integrated into a mobile app experience that provides recovery journey support. 

FEATURING: The San Antonio Center for the Intrepid 

INTERVIEWS WITH: Notable burn experts as well as service men and women who have overcome their injuries.